Tuesday, June 5, 2012

Liberty Shirt with Pulled Collar


One of my local sewing pals, Sara, saw this collar on a RTW boutique tunic. She reverse engineered this interesting treatment and shared it with me.

It's a straight collar, with no stand. There is a long bias tie, sewn at the CF of both fronts, and exiting through buttonholes at CB. You can pull the tie and knot it at the back. When you pull it, the fronts of the collar turn inward.

I decided to use the Liberty top as a vehicle for the collar.

I wasn't sure how this would look on me, as I don't have a particularly long swan-like neck, so I decided to use this cotton shirting from FabricMart, as a test fabric. I think it looks ok on me, though it would be even better on a long necked woman with short hair, I think. I may make it again, but I'd use a linen fabric or something more edgy.


Closeup of dyed buttons, next to an undyed button.

I have a lot of these mother of pearl buttons in my button box, as they were very cheap at Fabrix. Long ago, maybe two years ago, I threw a bunch of these buttons in a cup of red dye. (Dylon, I think. Or maybe liquid Rit.) I left the cup on my counter for weeks, hoping the buttons would turn red. They did not turn red. They turned pink. I don't sew with much pink fabric, but the shade was perfect for this shirting.

Before I took most of the hangar shots, I pinned an original, undyed, mother of pearl button near the shaded buttons so you can see the subtle shading of the dyed buttons.


Closeup of tie in the back collar.


Closeup of collar.


Hangar shot

46 comments:

  1. Fantastic! How very clever and what a great result. I'm thinking there is a buttonhole near each front collar as well as the two in the back (and the tie passes between the inside and outside collar pieces)? Sewing is great when you can mix and match ideas. Another fabulous top Shams.

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    1. Thanks, Dilliander! No, no other buttonholes. The tie is sewn into the side seams of the collar at each center front. The only buttonholes in the collar are at CB.

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    2. Of course! That makes better sense :)

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  2. very clever bit of reengineering, agree it would look great in linen

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  3. Another winner! I really like the fabric, collar and buttons and it looks great on you. You know we want to see some construction information if you have time to share?!

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    1. Thanks, Pin Queen! There is a bit more info if you search for Anonymous's comment below.

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  4. What an interesting collar treatment. Thanks for the inspiration.

    I think Dillander's suggestion would be sort of interesting, bringing the cording out to the outside of the collar for a bit then back in then out again at center back. It would add a ruffly effect, sort of like a grommet waistband with cording on cargo pants.

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    1. I agree, Kathryn. Dilliander has a very inventive mind and her version would be interesting.

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  5. What a fun application. A fun little twist.

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  6. You did a great job of knocking off that design. I think that is such a fun part of sewing--making a vision work. It's an interesting design detail.

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  7. What a wonderful collar technique, and you pulled it off perfectly. I always love to see what new techniques you perfect! Thanks for sharing!

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    1. Thanks, Linda! I try not to plan too far ahead, so I don't always know what I'm doing next either. ;)

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  8. What a wonderful, fun collar!

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  9. The shirt is kewl and of course it is because you do make the kewlest clothes but what really interested me was the dyeing of that Mother of Pearl button. I have a ton of those too and now I've got to go out and get some dye and try this! Thanks for the tip!

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    1. Thanks, Carolyn. Though now I'm thinking it was liquid Rit. Yeah, I'm pretty sure it was Rit.

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  10. Oh my goodness, another totally cool top with just the perfect edge to make it so interesting.

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  11. Lovely collar detail and the shirt looks great on you, Shams! The texture of the fabric looks almost like a seersucker and I especially like the knot on the collar back.

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    1. I agree, Louisa, the fabric really reminded me of a seersucker once I washed it. I definitely describe it as a fabric that has suckered up!

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  12. Shams - I think it looks great on you! If you are concerned about the collar height/your neck length - maybe shorten the collar a tad on your next version? I think this design would look great with an open/banded sleeve instead of cuffed too - just as an option! I always am inspired by your fun and quirky design aesthetic - thanks!

    Sew Maris

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    1. Thanks, Maris! I agree, a tad narrower collar might be better on me. This top does not have cuffs, the hems are just turned up, but, I agree, it would be fun to play with the sleeve hem.

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  13. Love it. I think it's *really* flattering on you. I'm inspired to try, especially since I have the long skinny neck and short hair thing, I also am intrigued by Dillander's and Kathryn's thoughts.

    I'm not sure I have a suitable pattern to play with. I'll have to check out the Liberty top.

    Thanks for sharing!

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    1. Hey, Ninja! I hope you do try it. If you look a bit further down, I left more details for Anonymous on how it's constructed.

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  14. That shirt looks spectacular on you! I love the collar. That is a wonderful idea and it looks so kicky with the fabric you used. I love the stripe! This was really a home run!

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  15. Shams, I thought I recognized that fabric when you posted your housekeeping hint a few days ago. I have some of the same from Fabric Mart and can't wait to try a copy cat version of yours. Can you give me an approximate measurement of the width of the collar?

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    1. Good eye on recognizing the fabric beneath the dust bunnies, anonymous! I measured and the front of the collar is 3-1/4" wide (finished) and the back is 3" wide (finished). However, the neckline is not the same as the original pattern. It's a bit lower and a bit more "rounded." You'll have to experiment a bit.

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    2. By the way, the fabric tie is cut on the bias, is 30" long, and cut to be 3/8" finished. There is no channel for it. It is just sewn into the CF seams and emerges through the two buttonholes at CB. Since this fabric is rather floppy, I interfaced the back collar, but not the front. I used a fusible interfacing that gives some stability without changing the fabric hand much. I think it was from Pam Erny, but it is not labeled.

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  16. I love that collar, and I definitely need to remember the button dyeing technique, thanks!

    I would like to see the shirt in a linen. I admit that I thought on first glance, I thought this shirt is just not "you", but when I try seeing it through fresh, don't-know-you eyes, it looks fine on you.

    Isn't it interesting how perspective can change with a simple attitude adjustment?

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    1. lol. Yes, I agree! I do think I will make it again in a funkier fabric and I will narrow the collar a tad.

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  17. Interesting top. Looks good on you!

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  18. It is a neat collar design, thanks for sharing. I am already envisioning a variation with a channel for the tie and a wider edge at the top of the collar that would add more gathers near the top edge. It is so unusual to see you in a light colored top.

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  19. Love this collar idea and I think it looks good on you. It's the kind of collar that may have nearly universal appeal, I think, framing the face as it does. Cool. thanks.

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  20. Shams, this is a really pretty top on you. You have the fitting perfected. I love the collar and how the armhole seam sits at the perfect spot to create that energetic, youthful mien you exhibit. Armhole seam placement can make such a difference!

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  21. I love that shirt....especially the collar design...I also need to remember your button dying technique...I have quite a few of those buttons, too!

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  22. Love that funky collar! This shirt looks great, and I know you'll make another that more clearly speaks "Shams".

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  23. That princess seam is a great look for you - makes it possible to get the armscye positioned where it needs to be. This is a real challenge for the full-busted gal (I used to have this problem).

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  24. What a nifty effect -- that's a great blouse on you, too.

    I thought I was completely over collared shirts, but trust Shams to get me re-thinking my prejudices! What a great result from a pattern and fabric that, in other hands (mine!), might have looked just a bit blah.

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  25. Wonderful technique and adds an usual twist to an otherwise normal shirt collar. Thanks for sharing

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  26. wow and wow. Very Cute Collar and the pink buttons are perfect!

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  27. Cute outfit, Shams! I love stand collars, especially if they have funky engineering.

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  28. Another winner Shams! I love your 'quirky' details. I must try a few myself - although the management might not be too sure (not that I ever look to him for style advice!)

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