Saturday, January 2, 2016

Green Minoru with Wool Interlining


Hola, everyone! I hope 2016 is treating you well.

TOC:

Minoru

I just looked it up—I started sewing this jacket on December 5th! I thought I had finished on New Years Eve, but I realized that it needed a bit more stitching, so I finally finished on New Years Day. For me, that's a long time on one garment!

I think it was two Christmases ago that my youngest daughter went to a local fabric store that I like, and she chose a fabric as my Christmas gift.

A couple years back, DD1 chose this jacquard as my Christmas gift

It's a two-sided jacquard fabric (info on brocade vs jacquard fabrics) in two shades of green. It's not a particularly heavyweight fabric—one could use it for a dress...

Well, you could, but I would never wear a dress made out of this fabric. Never ever. I liked it, but it stumped me: I'm not a brocade or jacquard sort of person. It's more formal than I would generally wear. If I hadn't liked the fabric, it would have migrated into my stash, never to be seen again, but I did like it. Every so often, I'd pull it out and try to figure out how to use it. Then I'd put it away and let in marinate some more.

I finally decided to make an anorak jacket. Because the fabric is too lightweight for a coat, I plundered my stash and located an Ellen Tracy wool fabric to use as an interlining. I used Pam Erny's wet-towels-and-wool-into-the-dryer technique to preshrink the wool.

Do you know the difference between interlining and underlining? Underlining is when you cut the pattern pieces twice, once in the fashion fabric and once in the lining fabric. You put them together and treat them as one layer. Underlining generally uses a lightweight fabric and is used to improve the stability of a fabric, or the hand of a fabric, or the sheerness of a fabric, or to minimize wrinkling in the completed garment. Or all of the above. Interlining is similar, except it's generally intended to increase the warmth of the finished garment. You can interline either the outside pattern pieces OR the lining pattern pieces. For my coat, I interlined the outside pattern pieces, so it's constructed in the same way as regular underlining. Sometimes an interlining is removable, as in a removable zippered lining.

A 100% sage-green wool from Ellen Tracy. It's rather loosely woven but has a nice, fluffy loft. I preshrank it in the dryer with wet towels.

I baste the fashion fabric and interlining together using bobbin thread in weird colors—it's nice to free up some bobbins.

I spent a lot of time deciding on which pattern to use. I had purchased the Minoru pattern several years ago but, OF COURSE, I couldn't lay my hands on it. It is no longer available in paper form, so I had to buy the PDF and print off the 50-something pages. I spend a lunchtime at work, at a giant table in a conference room, taping it together.

I really hate that process. But it was worth it. (Interestingly enough, my paper copy of the pattern still hasn't shown up. Usually the missing item shows up as soon as I buy it again!)

The Minoru has the following features:

  • Raglan sleeves
  • Lining
  • An unlined hood that can be rolled up and stuffed into the collar, then zipped up
  • Elastic cuffs at the wrist that require 2" wide elastic
  • A partial elastic waist also uses 2" wide elastic
  • A front zipper
  • The coat gathers into the collar, but not directly at center front and center back. (Leaving those bits out of the gathering is a nice detail
  • An internal pocket, on the lining—this pattern has no external pockets
  • Waist shaping at the side seam
  • Lots of room at the hips

Unfortunately, the Minoru is only sized up to a 16. I typically start with an 18 for jackets/coats, so I had to trace off the 16 and spend some time altering it up. I made lots of alterations:

  • Added darts for my full bust. The jacket gathers into the collar, so it would be possible to rotate the dart into the neckline, thereby increasing the gathers, but I'm glad that I did NOT do this. Because I interlined the jacket, it was difficult enough to gather the thick fabric and would have been much more difficult had I increased the amount that needed to be gathered.
  • Increased the waist.
  • Removed many inches from the hips. Sewaholic Patterns drafts for a pear shape, which I am not.
  • This pattern has REALLY LONG sleeves. I typically have to shorten sleeves by about an inch, but these were 4 or 5 inches too long. The pattern includes a 2" elastic cuff, which I omitted. I left the sleeves long because I decided to line them to the edge with the reverse side of the jacquard, and fold them back to create contrasting cuffs.
  • The pattern has no external pockets, and only one internal pocket on the lining. I added slant, single welt pockets in addition to the internal pocket. Pockets are goooood.
    Constructing the welt pocket

    Completed pocket and zipper
  • Converted the two-piece hood (which uses a single pattern piece) to a 3-pc hood (which requires two pattern pieces). The center piece is 4" wide. Before making this change, I reduced the height of the hood. I also lined the hood with the reverse of the jacquard. I believe that she left the hood unlined because it is intended to be rolled into the collar, but I really don't care. I much prefer to have a warmer hood with both lining and interlining, even if it makes for a fatter collar. (I plan to keep the hood unfurled, anyway.)
    The hood unfurled.

    The hood furled.

Other materials used:

  • A standard 18" YKK zipper for the collar, purchased at Britex.
  • A custom, 34", double-ended zipper, with a specialty zipper pull, from ZipperStop. I'm so spoiled by double-ended zippers! I love that I can zip up my jacket, or vest, and unzip the bottom few inches to make sitting more comfortable, and create a more flattering vertical line.
  • For the lining, I used two fabrics. For the sleeves and collar, I used the same jacquard as the outside, but I used the reverse (lighter green) side. I didn't have enough for the body, so I also used a gorgeous, textured, stretch fabric, also from stash. I lined the sleeves to the very edge so that I could fold them back to create a contrasting cuff.
    Pic of lining, taken under an incandescent light after dark.

Pressing a raglan seam with my beloved, hand-made, extra-long clapper.

More construction notes:

  • Other reviewers pointed out that raw edges showed when the hood is out. Some remedied this by covering the raw edges with binding. Instead, I added another layer of collar lining, as described here.
    Look, Ma! No raw edges!
  • I topstitched using regular thread (this color was hard to match and wasn't available in topstitching thread) using a triple stitch, as described in the Minoru sew-along.
  • When I sewed the hood lining to the hood, I used the technique called "faux piping" to create a contrast edge around the hood.
  • While jackets with waist elastic look great on some women, I really hate how it makes me look like a stuffed sausage. Even if the elastic doesn't go all the way around, it tends to pull at the front in a way I find unattractive. So I left it out, though I did taper the side seam at the waist to give myself some shaping.
Camouflage!

THANKS, DD2, for the gift of a fabric that challenged me! I am very happy with my new jacket.


Snap Press

DK-93

I've been wanting a Snap Press for a long time.

So long that I'd forgotten completely about it.

This morning, a sewing pal, Karla K, pointed out that there is a good deal to be had. A really good deal. For $70, and free shipping, I bought a snap press and a set of dies for setting Snap Source prong snaps. I bought the DK-93, which you can learn more about on the Iconic Patterns blog. The good deal that Karla found is at Gold Star Tool.com.

Thanks, Karla!


Misc

Just a few things to add.

I am going to Seattle this month. It's a work trip, but I hope to sneak in a visit to see the Counter-Couture: Fashioning Identity in the American Counterculture at the Bellevue Arts Museum.


I'm going to Whistler, British Colombia, at the end of February. When I wore my new Minoru out today, it was nippy at 42° F. I looked up the weather in Whistler at noon today, and it was 18° F, with a projected high of 28°.

Oh my.

If this is indicative of the weather in February, I am not prepared! I would rather not buy or make gear for that kind of weather, given that I will only be there for a couple of days, and I won't be skiing.

'Tis a challenge, I tell you!


Last night I had dinner with my daughters. DD1 is returning to university soon. (DD2 is taking the year off, working, and earning money. Next year she is planning to attend university in Canada.) We went to Burma SuperStar in the Richmond district. I've eaten here before, though ever since the place has been profiled on various foodie shows on television, the insanely long lines are a bit off-putting. But last night I tried the Fermented Tea Leaf Salad.

Oh My Goodness.

I might have to try making it (or here). If you google this salad, you will find recipes, kits, reviews. Yes, it's a Thing.

At dinner, my daughters gave me my final Christmas present. Custom mouse pads! I love them! One for home, one for my Mountain View office, and one for my San Francisco office. I'm a sucker for this sort of thing. ;)

105 comments:

  1. Fabulous jacket. Looks great. A lot of changes for fit and to add pockets. I've read great reviews and was going to buy but the sizing put me off. I have a couple of other patterns for jackets where size is closer (and they're not PDFs!) Do you reckon I need to go for the Minoru? (Impossible question, I know)

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    1. Thanks, Anne! I do think it's a very well drafted pattern. It's a shame that she didn't do a greater range of sizing, though. I like the RTW details, though I can't imagine why she left off any pockets. ;)

      I also just bought her Robson Trench coat. That will be my third Sewaholic pattern, having also made the Renfrew several times.

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  2. Shams...you make me feel like a very lazy seamstress ...what a great project and even better result.

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    1. Debra, I am sure that it's not true! And thanks. :)

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  3. Great jacket...and fabulous post. You explain what you do (and WHY) in such a clear and understandable manner. Way to go, Shams!

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  4. Next time call me! I think I know where my Minoru pattern is. This is so well thought out and executed. Not surprised it took close to a month. You'll find enough nippy weather to enjoy your gorgeous creation. I'll bet you DD is pretty happy with this too.

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  5. What a marvelous cold weather jacket!! The fabric makes this so gorgeous and perfect!! I am going to be sure to ask for your advice, when I make this jacket. It is the best possible jacket for your trip to Whistler, B.C.! Do you know where you will be staying in Whistler?? It is a beautiful town.

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    1. Thanks, Jennifer! Whistler is a team building trip, so I do not know where I will be staying.

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  6. Your new jacket is very flattering to your figure, well done! For cold weather, many Coloradoans layer: thin sweater atop turtleneck, with vest over, jacket on top. Might work for you.

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    1. Thanks! I'll have to see if I can squeeze all of that under this coat! thx

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  7. Gorgeous Minoru. I love how you omitted the waistline elastic. Nicely done!

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  8. Really beautiful job on the jacket. I've been discouraged by all the alterations I would need for this pattern, so I'm really impressed at your ambition and skill. And for Whistler, I agree with Carol: layers, plus scarf and hat should keep you toasty!

    Thanks as always for the inspiration!

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    1. Wendy, to be honest, EVERY pattern I make requires alterations. It is what it is. Thanks! :)

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  9. Wonderful jacket! I love the hood and collar, as well as how you utilized the double-sided fabric. Great job! I just noticed that you almost blend in with the leafy background!

    Rose in SV

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    1. Thanks, Rose! Yeah, I could have chosen a more contrasty background. :)

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  10. Re Whistler: silk underwear for the first layer. WinterSilks has a good assortment.

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    1. Thanks for that lead, Elle! I will look into it.

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  11. Love, love, love it! Very flattering on you. To me, a month seems very quick for such a complex project. You rock.

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  12. Love, love, love it! You amaze, as always. ONLY a month????

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  13. Cool jacket.

    Have you heard of places that rent warm jackets and deliver to your hotel? I wonder if the concierge at your hotel can help you find such a service?

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    1. No, I haven't heard about that service. Interesting.

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  14. Your jacket is lovely - and such a great use of fabric. The temperatures here in Alberta are similar to those you have mentioned for Whistler and I think your jacket will be fine. As long as the wind isn't blowing you should be good. I usually get most of the way through winter wearing a fleece or a wrap. I do have a down jacket for really cold days (-22f), but usually get away with much lighter jackets. If you are concerned - take layers like a padded vest, fleece top etc. Happy travels!

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    1. Wow, you sound incredibly hard, twotoast! Thanks for that advice.

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  15. I love your new jacket! Was wondering what you were working on and even though it took 3 weeks to complete, it was worth it. But it's amazing, I just made a cardigan out of that Ellen Tracey fabric that you used for an underlining. I got mine at Fabric Mart. Is that where your's came from?

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    1. That's too funny, Carolyn! I think so, but it's been years. Thanks!

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  16. You will love the Counter Culture exhibit! It's full of textures and colors used in harmony/opposition. And pretty dang funky.
    Your jacket is good inspiration for my ongoing raincoat project. Nice hood alteration!

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    1. Thanks, SJ! I am looking forward to that exhibit!

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  17. I think you started with a Minoru but after all the refinements, alterations and perfections that you've done I think you could call it your own! Thanks for the clear and precise explanations of your make.

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  18. I have made two Minorus and thought that was enough - now I have seen yours without the,waist elastic I am considering a third. Gorgeous jacket Shams, and with the suggested extra fine layers it may well be just right for Whistler.

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    1. Thanks, ML! Yes, I can see making another!

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  19. GORGEOUS jacket! Awesome addition to your wardrobe!!

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    1. Thanks, Kyle! I expect to wear this a lot!

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  20. OH WOW, Shams!! Would NEVER have thought to use that fabric for a coat. It turned out FABULOUS (as is pretty usual for your makes and creativity). Love, love it!

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    1. Linda, that's the ONLY way I could think to use it! Thanks!

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  21. I love your version of this jacket ! You always give so many wonderful how to details . Lucky you to have DD to help feed your sewing inspiration . DS barely know you are a sewer -:)

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    1. Thanks, Mary Ellen! Yes, my daughters both know that it's what I do. ;)

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  22. Love your Minoru! I've been thinking of making one, it is so Portland. It looks like I will be moving there in June. I can't decide if I want it just for rain or warmer.

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    1. Sherry, why not make TWO?! In fact, make a warmth one in a smaller size, maybe without a hood, and a rain one in a larger size, with a hood, to wear over it. :)

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    2. I could do that. I have some black with purple circles suede like fabric from Marcy's Paris specials. I'm sure I have an itchy wool I could use for an interlining. I would need to grade up for the raincoat, except for the hips. What are they thinking with only small sizes?

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    3. Yes, I hear you! Maybe start by making the "warmer" Minoru and then decide if you like it well enough to grade it up.

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  23. This is a really beautiful jacket, and so flattering too; and your post is full of your customary generosity. Thank you.
    Sallyxx

    sarsaparillasal.blogspot.com

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    1. Thanks for that kind comment, Sally!

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  24. Fabulous jacket. Looks great. A lot of changes for fit and to add pockets. I've read great reviews and was going to buy but the sizing put me off. I have a couple of other patterns for jackets where size is closer (and they're not PDFs!) Do you reckon I need to go for the Minoru? (Impossible question, I know)

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    1. Thanks, Anne! The Minoru is well drafted, has nice RTW details, and looks good on a variety of figures. What other patterns are you considering? There are definitely other options, so it is hard to say!

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  25. Loving your camouflage shot.

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  26. Wow, that's just gorgeous. Your DD did great in the fabric selection. I think this is one of my favorites of your garments. Thanks for the great details on your process.

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    1. Wow, thanks Andsewforth! Maybe I should have DD approve all purchases. Nawwww. ;)

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  27. What a beautiful coat. Great 'marriage' of fabric to pattern.
    Marcia

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  28. What a fabulous jacket. It looks great. We're having a cold snap up here in B.C. right now. Typical February temps are in the 40 degree range, though possibly colder up on the mountain. A fleece under the jacket would probably do.

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    1. Oh, that is so good to hear, Felicia! I will be watching the weather in Whistler over the next month plus. Thanks!

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  29. great choice to remove the waist elastic - long lean look is nice. and am I allowed to say hurrah for an interesting color (as opposed to black or grey) in a jacket. Very nice.

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  30. Wow, that jacket is crazy gorgeous. And if you want some advice on dressing for Canadian weather--layers. That's it. You'll be fine, just make sure you enjoy the scenery. Oh, and thank you for posting that link to the Black Eye Pea and Quinao Chili. I made some on New Years Eve and it was delicious! It even tasted better the next day. Happy New Year.

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    1. Yes, that chili is definitely better the next day! I'm so glad you tried it! And thanks!

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  31. Fabulous coat Shams. It looks fabulous and I bet you could wear it at Whistler.
    Add a wool sweater or two to you packing, a couple of pairs of wool socks and the silk long johns. That would be for outside. In the forecasted temperatures (which we are experiencing right now in Kamloops which is east and north of Whistler I wear a t-shirt and jeans with a fleece hoodie and a ski jacket liner and running shoes (wear boots as they have more snow). I would wear warm gloves and a toque when outside for extra warmth.
    Enjoy your time at Whistler as it is suppose to be very nice there. We did Sun Peaks which has a similar climate as Whistler and it was a very snowy day when we went.

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    1. Ann, you sound very hardy! Thanks for your advice on how to prepare for Whistler! And thanks!

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  32. What a beautiful jacket! I absolutely love it! Happy New Year!

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    1. Thanks, MW! And Happy New Year to you, too!

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  33. Love the coat and the fabric treatment, a real winner!

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  34. Love this new jacket. Your fabric choice is having me think of using some brocade in a more casual style garment. Like your hood pattern change and addition of pockets - gotta have them in a jacket. As usual, your explanations are so clear and helpful. I agree that silk underwear plus layering will do well for your trip to BC. Buying or making a heavy coat would probably be wasteful considering your home location. Thanks for this good post for the new year. Karen

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    1. Hi Karen! Several years back I made a similar Style Arc jacket, that time using an Armani brocade. It's a great way to dress down a dressy fabric!

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  35. Hello Shams,
    I do hope you have time to visit District fabric again. Although I live near Seattle (Sequim) I had never heard of it. I visited after you mentioned it and found delicious fabric there.Thank you for the tip! I now you are always busy on your trips but if you have any free time I'd love to meet you.
    Sue infotectives@gmail.com

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    1. Hi Sue! I am not sure if I will have free time, but I will let you know once my meetings are firmed up.

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  36. Oh I do like your new coat. I don't think I would have thought of a coat for this fabric, but it looks really good.

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  37. Wow, you did an exquisite job and got an exquisite outcome!

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  38. Your efforts really show here. You did a great job and the brocade is awesome as is the green color. Wonderful coat!

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  39. You did it again! Great use of a 'fancy fabric ' for everyday. Did you use a walking foot to topstitch? I often slip and slide when I sew on this fabric.

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    1. Thanks, Mary Glenn! No, I didn't find a walking foot necessary. I will say that this fabric raveled like crazy, though! What a pain!

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  40. What a fancy, functional jacket! I love your stylish zippers and have a question. How do you change the pull?

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    1. Thanks, Mary Helen! If you look at the post, I included a screenshot of my zipper order. I purchased the double-ended zipper from ZipperStop in NYC. I also purchased the "fancy" zipper pull from their selection. Then, for $1, you request that they customize the zipper. In my case, I bought a 36" zipper and asked them to shorten it to 34". And I also asked that they install the pull on the zipper. It's important to remember to do that. Once I forgot and the pull came in the envelope separate from the zipper and I had to install it myself. It was a pain. ;)

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  41. That is one gorgeous jacket. While nothing you make ever looks "homemade," this coat blows it out of the park!

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  42. Shams, you are ridiculously talented! When I grow up I want to be like you
    Ellen (who is 58 and probably already older than you!)

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    1. p.s. not sure why I'm showing up as "unknown" but will check on that : )

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    2. Awwww, thanks, Ellen. You are only older than me by a smidgen. ;)

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  43. Oooh...I love your Minoru. I've recently been considering making another one for myself, and I really like the idea of no elastic this time. I solved the hood lining dilemma by trimming my seam allowances close and top stitching, but I like the idea of a lining too.

    Now! Whistler! I love Whistler. We mostly go there in the summer, but we did visit last January. I'm really hoping to go again this winter season! I have several down jackets...I'm Canadian after all LOL...but I can well understand that winter outerwear isn't something that you want to invest in. I'd say go the layer route. Cotton tank top, long sleeved cotton top, sweater, vest, jacket. I find the vest layer most helpful...helps keeps my torso warm. If you aren't skiing, but going more for the experience and the ambiance of the resort, you'll be in and out of hotels, shops and restaurants and hopefully that will help you warm up after being outdoors. Of course, hat, scarf and mittens are essential, and warm socks and boots. One thing to be aware of is that gravel is used to provide traction on walking paths, probably salt too, so if you plan on going for a winter wonderland walk wear boots that are practical over pretty. If there's moisture in the form of rain at all, the paths can get kind of muddy.

    Let me know if you want any other Whistler recommendations!!!

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    1. Hey, Sue! It sounds like I need to shop for some under layers before trekking to Whistler. Thanks!

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    2. The other option is to stay indoors, LOL. Lots of lovely lounging to be had at the high-end hotels.

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  44. It's a terrific jacket! The color is very flattering on you, but I can't see you wearing it as a dress either. As a coat, it's unique and fits your style very well. Brava!

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    1. Thanks, Nancy! Yeah, a dress in this fabric is Not For Me. ;)

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  45. I have a knee-length lightweight canvas jacket with cotton lining and some sort of lofty interlining that I bought many years ago. I wore it happily in California fall and winters without overheating, but I also wore it on a well site in West Virginia on a snowy December day when we were supervising a frac job. With hat, gloves, scarf, and warm layers underneath I think you'll be fine.

    I love this jacket so much I can't even tell you. I always love reading about your makes, because you really make me think of using fabric in ways I would never have imagined.

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    1. Thanks for that info, LW! And thanks for your kind words. :)

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  46. Gorgeous Minor and great idea to interline it and remove the elastic, more thoughts for another version for me.

    Snap, I got that snap press for Christmas, Lena's post was perfect timing and saved me a lot of money.

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    1. Have you used it yet, Sharon? Mine still hasn't arrived. And thanks!

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    2. Not yet, been too busy to sew and waiting for the dies to arrive.

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  47. A wonderful jacket - a true labor of love!
    Thanks for sharing the whole process.

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  48. Love, Love, Love the look of the jacket. Green is my fav color, too. That might help me with some two-sided fabric I have. Thanks for the tip on the snap press.

    Sue C

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