Tuesday, August 4, 2015

Cross-Dyed Linen Jacket with Bias Fringe


Hi, it's Shams from Communing with Fabric with another garment made from a lovely Britex fabric!

When Britex asked me to choose one of their linen fabrics, I was drawn to their Cross-dyed Turquoise Linen.

Note: This fabric is difficult to photograph. In real life, it seems less saturated to my eye than shown in this photo, but it looks more sky blue in some of my photos than in real life. In any case, it's a lovely color and you can always order a swatch!

I am a huge fan of linen that is woven with one color in the warp direction, and another in the weft. With linen, this effect is generally referred to as a cross dye (though it's actually cross woven, but it's referred to as cross dye) and I love the resulting visual texture.

Earlier this spring, I made a jacket using cross-dyed linen and the Tessuti Silva jacket pattern. This pattern is suited for linen and features a raw bias edging. The concept is that, with time and washing, the bias edge gently frays. But I am an impatient sort, so I fray the edge manually using a low-tech tool—my thumbnails!

I like the effect, but it does take awhile. For this jacket, I timed how long it took to fray the outer edge of the jacket: 3 hours and 17 minutes. I neglected to time my fraying of the sleeve hems, which probably took another half hour.

It created a lot of lint!

But the effect is totally worth it!

I made a few other changes. My last version of this pattern had no pockets and I like pockets! I made a patch pocket, but when I pinned it to the front of the jacket, it made the jacket hang awkwardly. I decided to center the pocket over the side seam, which worked great!

I had small pieces of canvas that had been stenciled and painted by Miles Frode. I purchased these from Diane Ericson last spring at Puyallup Sew Expo.

I cut several rectangles from the canvas and trimmed them with the beautiful selvedge from the linen. I embellished the back, the pocket, and the right front edge with these pieces.
 
 
 
Finally, I closed the jacket using large snaps that I covered with scraps of turquoise lining.

I now have another great linen jacket for the warm weather, on those rare occasions that I leave San Francisco to go somewhere warm!

Thanks to Britex for the fabric!

And welcome to Kirby, the cutest pug puppy EVER!

63 comments:

  1. Well, hello, Miss Glamorous! What a perfect setting for your pretty new jacket upon which you lavished so much work, with superb results.

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  2. Simply stunning! I am in awe.

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  3. I love how you purchase beautiful elements and hold onto them to use on future garments. The jacket is pretty but the embellishments take it to the next level!

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    1. Thanks, Carolyn! I was so happy when I realized that those pieces by Miles would work with this fabric!

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  4. This is a beautiful jacket! I love it on you so much. The color palette in this outfit is perfect for this time of year too. Another great work, shams.

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  5. The stencilled pieces look wonderful combined with this pattern, you do have a very clever knack for creating interesting design elements that are so wearable and unique. Love it (and must revisit this pattern myself).

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  6. What a delightfully summery jacket! I always find your attention to the smallest details on your garments so inspiring: the covered snaps, using the selvedges as well as the bias edging, the painted fabric as decorative elements... and do I spy some more of the painted fabric on the front, lined up in the place where buttons might go? Truly your work is masterful.

    I am glad to know that "cross-dyed" linen means warp one color and weft another - I always referred to that type of fabric as "shot" as in shot silk, but didn't know that there was a different term for linen. It is a favorite type of fabric of mine, the few times I have found any

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    1. Thanks, Alison! Those details can really take a long time to do, but I do think they are worth the effort. Usually. ;)

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    2. Oh, and yes, I also cut small pieces of the canvas and placed them where the snaps are. They also have the selvedge sewn around the edges. I guess I should have included another close-up, but I felt like I had so many already!

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  7. Oh, fun! I love what you did. All of it!

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  8. Lovely and what a pretty colour. And very clever use of those canvas pieces.

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  9. A very beautiful jacket with lots of interesting features. It should be a very valuable addition to your already lovely wardrobe.
    Cute dog. Is it yours?

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    1. Thanks, Material Lady! No, that is Kirby, the new puppy at Britex Fabrics! He is a sweetie pie, so mellow. I visited the store and took those pics when he was 16 weeks old, but he must be 18 weeks now.

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  10. This jacket looks great. I particularly like the embellishments (I did the fraying thing on a blizzard just this week!), those really do like paintings. Really inventive.

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    1. Thanks, Laura! I googled but I don't know what you mean by "blizzard". Is that a pattern?

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    2. Ooh sorry about that, my phone keyboard auto complete has been going crazy for a couple of weeks (I should file a bug!). I meant blouse.

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  11. All those nice details make for an outstanding jacket...Love it!!!

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  12. Inspirational. I love seeing jackets like yours that are not over-done with the artsy stuff, but still different from the ordinary! Great job.

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    1. Thanks, Mary! Yes, I like artsy stuff, but it has to work with my aesthetic. It's hard for me to describe what that means!

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  13. I echo all the other comments, but have to say that Kirby is the cutest!! Can't believe you've taken on a puppy. He looks like a darling.

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    1. Thanks, Sue! Kirby is not my puppy (my elderly cat wouldn't appreciate that). His is owned by the owner of Britex Fabrics.

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    2. Oh, and Kirby is a darling! He's very mellow!

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  14. I'm a big fan of using selvedges to highlight something but the lining covered snaps are new to me. What a fab idea!
    Gorgeous summer jacket.

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    1. Yes! I loooooove me some selveges! Covered snaps are a long-standing detail on couture garments, but a bit unusual on an arty garment ;)

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  15. This is lovely. I don't think I would ever take it off! Gorgeous color and the fringe is perfect.

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  16. Fan-ta-stick! Color, details, proportions, all perfect for you. I love how you used Miles pieces. And the fraying, the snaps, the side pocket...yes! And the puppy, is he the newest member of the Britex staff?
    Great make, Shams!

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    1. Thanks so much, Gayle! Yes, Kirby is a Britex doggie, though he's up in the office as he's still at a very tender age.

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  17. I'm really interested in the fraying technique used here! I'm particularly jazzed by low-tech techniques lately, and I'd love to know if the fraying holds its beauty, without looking "worn", as opposed to artfully distressed!

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    1. Thanks, mimi! That is a very good question! I might create another fringed piece and run it through the laundry a few times to see how it holds up. I don't wash these light jackets much, so I am not sure.

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  18. So, so beautiful! You really knocked this one out of the ballpark! Love the side pocket, the judicious use of the lovely art scraps, the color and the location.
    And the puppy!

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  19. Love the colour, the fabric and the amazing jacket. The fabric accents really make the jacket a one of a kind art piece. Especially like the faux buttons down the front. Puppy accessory is perfect.

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  20. Another fabulous jacket.-- that linen is gorgeous. The canvas pieces are perfect & the fringe really adds to the jacket. And that pug puppy is beautiful -- makes me miss mine even more.

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    1. Thanks, Andsewforth! I hear you! I am not a "dog person" but that puppy just about changed my mind! Soooooo cute and so mellow.

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  21. I liked your first jacket from this pattern, this one I like even more!

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  22. A stunning jacket with fine details. Thanks for sharing.

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  23. Really a perfect color for you, that first photo is particularly flattering!

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  24. Beautiful photos. I agree that this color is very becoming on you. Iespecially like your frayed bias trimmed edges.

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  25. I love the jacket!! My two favorite things blue and linen.

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    1. Thanks, Tracy! I never used to wear much linen, but it's growing on me!

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  26. Beautiful jacket! The patches make for a great contrast and the snaps are lovely. I made a linen jacket with this kind of trim, but it wasn't on the bias. Now you have me thinking how the bias would fray differently...the fringing does take time--I used the business end of one of my pins, but it makes for such a cool effect. I say whatever natural properties a fabric has, you should put those to your advantage, and all of your fringing efforts really show off the true beauty of this linen!

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    1. Thanks, Elizabeth! Yes, bias fringe is much slower to create than straight-of-grain or cross-grain fringe, but the effect is worth it.

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  27. The jacket is fabulous. What a beautiful color on you! And where did you find the most perfect backdrop for your fashion shoot? Love it!

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    1. Thanks, Bunny! Diane Ericson asked me if these photos were taken in Italy. I wish! This is an elementary school one block from my house. Several elementary schools here in SF are decorated with mosaics.

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  28. I love your jacket Shams!! Thanks for all your details - very interesting read.

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